Beyond Infancy?

The trend over recent years has been for technology services to be provided on an “as a service” (aaS) basis.  The flexibility of an always available, highly and immediately scalable service for which you subscribe on a short term basis with fees directly linked to usage based metric(s) is compelling.  The drive to adopt aaS offerings by consumers and businesses has been one of the signs of our world going digital.    I do recognise that concerns remain for some primarily in relation to data portability and security.  However, we have moved beyond the initial virtualised server offerings to more sophisticated platform and software based services.  Access methods have expanded beyond web browsers on computers to the current world of “apps” from a multiplicity of devices consuming “platform services”.  So all very empowering and exciting but where do we go next?

I am not alone in thinking that the future “aaS” offerings will be shaped by the Internet of Things (IoT).  The services we consume in the near future will be delivered based on many diverse real time data streams.  Data will be drawn from existing stores and combined with data generated by an ever larger set of sensor equipped devices, human centric or automated machine to machine (M2M).  The scale of this connected device proliferation is forecast to be vast.  CISCO predict 50 billion connected devices by 2020, Gartner 30 billion.  IDC believe that by the end of 2015 across the globe we will have connected just under 5,000 devices per minute for each of the 365 days.  The data from these devices will be used to enable and inform the digital services that will pervade our lives.

These digital services will be highly personalised, based on real-time analytics and contextual.   The personalisation will be all pervasive and extend beyond data unique to an individual.  Services will constantly learn and tailor themselves to each user or user group based on a vast stream of real-time received and analysed data that is context informed.   It is the contextual aspect that fascinates me the most.   Truly contextual services will be able to anticipate our needs and deliver unique experiences specific to us or defined user communities.   That ability for the digital service to anticipate will come with need for careful design to avoid slipping into being annoyingly intrusive.

The privacy aspects of digital services are complex and fascinating.  They could seriously inhibit how services evolve over the next 5 to 10 years.  Many commentator are alarmed at how lightly many people trade data privacy to access a desirable service.  Some argue that currently services tend to be relatively isolated and so the risk of unexpected data leakage is acceptable.  This would seem to be at best naive to me.  However, I do accept that refusing to accept provider terms relies on there being viable equally alluring alternatives or strong willpower!  The security of the service platforms and volume of connected devices enabling these digital services is also clearly key.  Hence the increasing focus on this aspect of the enabling IoT wave in the last 12 months.  An interesting report published by HP in 2014 looked at 10 connected devices in the market today to enable various smart home services and all failed their security testing.  A similar outcome was reported by the BBC in testing they conducted on various domestic smart devices where their hackers were successful.

If we think the current aaS offerings are flexible and add value then the good news is that we have only begun to see the potential.  Digital services are just leaving the infant stage and moving becoming toddlers.  Any parent will know that this is both an exciting, challenging and at times worrying period

as the toddler becomes adept in their new skills.  Learning to walk is one thing, just remember that after that comes running!

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David Smith - CopyDavid Smith is vastly experienced in evolving, communicating & delivering technology enablement.  Roles as CIO, CTO, Chief Innovation & Technology Officer and Chief Security Officer at companies such as Fujitsu, PA Consulting and TMP, David views technology through a business value lens, connecting it to current market trends, challenges and opportunities.